Brian Chase

Fund Accountant. Graduate Student. Navy Veteran

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematics and Traditional Cuisine

The mathematics of Pasta: A process analysis to find unity, formulas and ways to express structure mathematics of pasta shapes, by their mathematical and geometric properties.
See more at: The Maths of Pasta by George L. Legendre - The article by By Ryan King

Image: 

  • 'Pasta By Design' - Created by a team of designers, ‘Pasta by Design’ book reveals the hidden mathematical beauty of pasta: its geometrical shapes and surfaces are explained by mathematical formulae, drawings and illustrations.
  • Animated gifs - From video: The traditional pasta making techniques used at Della Terra Pasta by Chris Becker [Video] - shared at here.

(Type of Pasta - From left to right:  Agnolotti - Tortellini - Saccottini - Sagne Incannulate - Pappardelle)

(via wildcat2030)

ancientart:

The Stela of Pakhaas, 2nd-1st century B.C.E., made of limestone.

The central vignette here features a unique combination of two types of stela illustration. Normally the deceased is shown offering to Osiris, lord of the underworld, or to another deity. Alternatively, the deceased and his or her spouse receive offerings from their family. At first glance, the stela seems to fit the second category. The dead person, Pakhaas, accompanied by his wife, Nesihor, who stands behind him holding a sistrum, or rattle, enjoys the oblations of his son, Pakhy (a nickname, in effect, Pakhaas, Jr.).
This scene, however, is hardly conventional. Pakhy’s censer and Nesihor’s sistrum rarely appear in scenes of offerings to humans, and Pakhaas is not depicted as a mortal. The small image of the god Osiris that sits on his knees indicates that Pakhaas has become that god. Pakhy thus becomes Horus, who offers to his dead father, Osiris, and Nesihor is Isis. (BM)

Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections, 71.37.2.

ancientart:

The Stela of Pakhaas, 2nd-1st century B.C.E., made of limestone.

The central vignette here features a unique combination of two types of stela illustration. Normally the deceased is shown offering to Osiris, lord of the underworld, or to another deity. Alternatively, the deceased and his or her spouse receive offerings from their family. At first glance, the stela seems to fit the second category. The dead person, Pakhaas, accompanied by his wife, Nesihor, who stands behind him holding a sistrum, or rattle, enjoys the oblations of his son, Pakhy (a nickname, in effect, Pakhaas, Jr.).

This scene, however, is hardly conventional. Pakhy’s censer and Nesihor’s sistrum rarely appear in scenes of offerings to humans, and Pakhaas is not depicted as a mortal. The small image of the god Osiris that sits on his knees indicates that Pakhaas has become that god. Pakhy thus becomes Horus, who offers to his dead father, Osiris, and Nesihor is Isis. (BM)

Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections71.37.2.

8bitfuture:

New LG TV rolls up like a poster.
This is an 18 inch flexible display from LG, with a 12,00 x 800 pixel resolution. The company expects a 60 inch 4K TV to be possible using this type of technology by 2017.
Not only does this screen look super cool, but it would drastically reduce shipping and storage costs if future TV’s were able to be sent rolled up in a small tube.
More tech stories at 8 Bit Future.

8bitfuture:

New LG TV rolls up like a poster.

This is an 18 inch flexible display from LG, with a 12,00 x 800 pixel resolution. The company expects a 60 inch 4K TV to be possible using this type of technology by 2017.

Not only does this screen look super cool, but it would drastically reduce shipping and storage costs if future TV’s were able to be sent rolled up in a small tube.

(Source: Mashable)

oupacademic:

Aurora Borealis by Frederic Edwin Church.

During the late 1850s and early 1860s Church was at the height of his powers, painting large-scale exhibition pieces, such as Twilight in the Wilderness (1860; Cleveland, OH, Mus. A.), The Icebergs (1861; Dallas, TX, Mus. A.), Cotopaxi (1862; Detroit, MI, Inst. A.) and Aurora Borealis (1865; Washington, DC, N. Mus. of Amer. A.). He continued to paint major works in the years immediately after the Civil War but with an increasing emphasis on visionary atmospheric effects reminiscent of J. M. W. Turner, as in Rainy Season in the Tropics (1866; San Francisco, CA, de Young Mem. Mus.), Niagara Falls, from the American Side (1867; Edinburgh, N.G.) and the Vale of St Thomas, Jamaica (1867; Hartford, CT, Wadsworth Atheneum).

From 'Church, Frederic Edwin' in Grove Art Online on Oxford Art Online. 
We’re examining inspiring landscapes this July on the Oxford Academic Tumblr. 
Image credit: Aurora Borealis. Frederick Edwin Church. 1865. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. 

oupacademic:

Aurora Borealis by Frederic Edwin Church.

During the late 1850s and early 1860s Church was at the height of his powers, painting large-scale exhibition pieces, such as Twilight in the Wilderness (1860; Cleveland, OH, Mus. A.), The Icebergs (1861; Dallas, TX, Mus. A.), Cotopaxi (1862; Detroit, MI, Inst. A.) and Aurora Borealis (1865; Washington, DC, N. Mus. of Amer. A.). He continued to paint major works in the years immediately after the Civil War but with an increasing emphasis on visionary atmospheric effects reminiscent of J. M. W. Turner, as in Rainy Season in the Tropics (1866; San Francisco, CA, de Young Mem. Mus.), Niagara Falls, from the American Side (1867; Edinburgh, N.G.) and the Vale of St Thomas, Jamaica (1867; Hartford, CT, Wadsworth Atheneum).

From 'Church, Frederic Edwin' in Grove Art Online on Oxford Art Online

We’re examining inspiring landscapes this July on the Oxford Academic Tumblr. 

Image credit: Aurora Borealis. Frederick Edwin Church. 1865. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

spokeart:

Limited edition fine art prints inspired by The Big Lebowski, now available via the Spoke Art gallery online store.

Part of Spoke Art’s “Quentin vs. Coen” art show, featuring over 60 international artists creating stunning tributes to the films of Tarantino and the Coen Brothers.

(via exhibition-ism)